News

Pacuare Lodge Has Its Eye on the Jaguar

The Jaguar is the largest feline in the western hemisphere, and was once common from the southwest United States to northern Argentina, but its numbers have been reduced by more than half over the past century. Despite their protected status, jaguars continue to be the target of many a hunter and rancher in Costa Rica. Pacuare Lodge lies in a vital area for jaguar conservation, within the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor – a mosaic of protected areas extending from Panama to Mexico. In a show of its commitment to the protection of this spectacular creature, Long Run Alliance Member Pacuare Lodge has for the past three years supported a study of jaguars within its 340 -hectare (836-acre) nature reserve.

The Jaguar is the largest feline in the western hemisphere, and was once common from the southwest United States to northern Argentina, but its numbers have been reduced by more than half over the past century. Despite their protected status, jaguars continue to be the target of many a hunter and rancher in Costa Rica. Pacuare Lodge lies in a vital area for jaguar conservation, within the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor – a mosaic of protected areas extending from Panama to Mexico. In a show of its commitment to the protection of this spectacular creature, Long Run Alliance Member Pacuare Lodge has for the past three years supported a study of jaguars within its 340 -hectare (836-acre) nature reserve.

It was under initial research conducted by Dr. Eduardo Carillo - one of Latin America’s top jaguar experts – with the assistance of Ms. Carolina Saenz - his student - that the existence of this elusive feline on the reserve was confirmed. With those encouraging results, Pacuare Lodge bolstered its support for the Jaguar research project and signed a 5-year agreement with Dr. Carillo to expand his research within the reserve. The Lodge provides food, accommodation and logistical support to him and his team of biologists; and has donated 30 camera traps to further facilitate the research.

This investment has not been without reward. In late 2010, one of the cameras captured footage of a pregnant jaguar – a great shot in the arm for Pacuare Lodge and the research team. As the jaguar is a highly solitary creature that does not stay in one area for prolonged periods of time, the research team is working to track down the pregnant female and document news of her offspring. 

Pacuare Lodge is continuously seeking ways to increase its support to this research programme. It plans to donate a further 40 camera traps in hopes that this programme will contribute to the development of better conservation policies for the Jaguar. You too can be a part of this exciting and rewarding project. By making a donation for the purchase of equipment or staying at the Pacuare Lodge, you can do your part in ensuring that this priceless tropical paradise survives for posterity.

For more information or to make a donation please visit www.pacuarelodge.com